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live pair

A “live pair” refers to a situation where two lawmakers have agreed to not vote on a particular matter.

This is typically done as a form of compromise or to avoid taking a stance on an issue.

In a pair, one member of the legislative body will abstain from voting, while the other member will also abstain from voting but for a different reason.

For example, one member may abstain because they support the legislation, while the other member may abstain because they oppose it. In this way, both members can maintain their stance on the issue without affecting the outcome of the vote.

Live pairs are commonly used in situations where a particular piece of legislation is controversial, and members of the legislative body may not want to publicly take a stance on the issue.

By agreeing to the tactic, they can avoid having to vote on the legislation while still being able to maintain their stance on the issue.

Because pairs are informal and unofficial arrangements, they are not counted in vote totals; however paired Members’ positions do appear in the Congressional Record.

Examples of “live pair” in a sentence

  • The members of the legislative body agreed to a live pair on the controversial bill, allowing them to avoid taking a public stance on the issue.
  • The live pair allowed both members to maintain their positions on the legislation without affecting the outcome of the vote.
  • The use of live pairs has become a common practice in the legislative body, helping to prevent gridlock and facilitate compromise.

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